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**** SAMPLE Test of Essential Academic Skills (Reading, Math, English, Science) Ver. 6, 2021 2021 Dumps ****

Question: 89
He was born a slave, but T. Thomas Fortune (18561928) went on to become a journalist, editor, and civil rights
activist, founding several early black newspapers and a civil rights organization that predated W. E. B. DuBois
Niagara Movement (later the NAACP). Like many black leaders of his time, Fortune was torn between the radical
leanings of DuBois and the more conservative ideology of Booker T. Washington. This 1884 essay, “The Negro
and the Nation,” dates from his more militant period. The war of the Rebellion settled only one question: It forever
settled the question of chattel slavery in this country. It forever choked the life out of the infamy of the
Constitutional right of one man to rob another, by purchase of his person, or of his honest share of the produce of
his own labor. But this was the only question permanently and irrevocably settled. Nor was this the all-absorbing
question involved. The right of a state to secede from the socalled Union remains where it was when the
treasonable shot upon Fort Sumter aroused the people to all the horrors of internecine war. And the measure of
protection which the national government owes the individual members of states, a right imposed upon it by the
adoption of the Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution, remains still to be affirmed. It was not sufficient that
the federal government should expend its blood and treasure to unfetter the limbs of four millions of people. There
can be a slavery more odious, more galling, than mere chattel slavery. It has been declared to be an act of charity
to enforce ignorance upon the slave, since to inform his intelligence would simply be to make his unnatural lot all
the more unbearable. Instance the miserable existence of sop, the great black moralist. But this is just what the
manumission of the black people of this country try has accomplished. They are more absolutely under the control
of the Southern whites; they are more systematically robbed of their labor; they are more poorly housed, clothed
and fed, than under the slave rgime; and they enjoy, practically, less of the protection of the laws of the state or of
the federal government. When they appeal to the federal government they are told by the Supreme Court to go to
the state authorities as if they would have appealed to the one had the other given them that protection to which
their sovereign citizenship entitles them! Practically, there is no law in the United States which extends its
protecting arm over the black man and his rights. He is, like the Irishman in Ireland, an alien in his native land.
There is no central or auxiliary authority to which he can appeal for protection. Wherever he turns he finds the
strong arm of constituted authority powerless to protect him. The farmer and the merchant rob him with absolute
immunity, and irresponsible ruffians murder him without fear of punishment, undeterred by the law, or by public
opinionwhich connives at, if it does not inspire, the deeds of lawless violence. Legislatures of states have framed a
code of laws which is more cruel and unjust than any enforced by a former slave state. The right of franchise has
been practically annulled in every one of the former slave states, in not one of which, today, can a man vote, think,
or act as he pleases. He must conform his views to the views of the men who have usurped every function of
governmentwho, at the point of the dagger, and with shotgun, have made themselves masters in defiance of every
law or precedent in our history as a government. They have usurped government with the weapons of the cowards
and assassins, and they maintain themselves in power by the most approved practices of the most odious of tyrants.
These men have shed as much innocent blood as the bloody triumvirate of Rome. Today, red handed murderers
and assassins sit in the high places of power, and bask in the smiles of innocence and beauty. The word
manumission (3rd paragraph) means
A. emancipation
B. duty
C. possessions
D. forgiveness
E. transportation
Answer: A
Question: 90
He was born a slave, but T. Thomas Fortune (18561928) went on to become a journalist, editor, and civil rights
activist, founding several early black newspapers and a civil rights organization that predated W. E. B. DuBois
Niagara Movement (later the NAACP). Like many black leaders of his time, Fortune was torn between the radical
leanings of DuBois and the more conservative ideology of Booker T. Washington. This 1884 essay, “The Negro
and the Nation,” dates from his more militant period. The war of the Rebellion settled only one question: It forever
settled the question of chattel slavery in this country. It forever choked the life out of the infamy of the
Constitutional right of one man to rob another, by purchase of his person, or of his honest share of the produce of
his own labor. But this was the only question permanently and irrevocably settled. Nor was this the all-absorbing
question involved. The right of a state to secede from the socalled Union remains where it was when the
treasonable shot upon Fort Sumter aroused the people to all the horrors of internecine war. And the measure of
protection which the national government owes the individual members of states, a right imposed upon it by the
adoption of the Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution, remains still to be affirmed. It was not sufficient that
the federal government should expend its blood and treasure to unfetter the limbs of four millions of people. There
can be a slavery more odious, more galling, than mere chattel slavery. It has been declared to be an act of charity
to enforce ignorance upon the slave, since to inform his intelligence would simply be to make his unnatural lot all
the more unbearable. Instance the miserable existence of sop, the great black moralist. But this is just what the
manumission of the black people of this country try has accomplished. They are more absolutely under the control
of the Southern whites; they are more systematically robbed of their labor; they are more poorly housed, clothed
and fed, than under the slave rgime; and they enjoy, practically, less of the protection of the laws of the state or of
the federal government. When they appeal to the federal government they are told by the Supreme Court to go to
the state authorities as if they would have appealed to the one had the other given them that protection to which
their sovereign citizenship entitles them! Practically, there is no law in the United States which extends its
protecting arm over the black man and his rights. He is, like the Irishman in Ireland, an alien in his native land.
There is no central or auxiliary authority to which he can appeal for protection. Wherever he turns he finds the
strong arm of constituted authority powerless to protect him. The farmer and the merchant rob him with absolute
immunity, and irresponsible ruffians murder him without fear of punishment, undeterred by the law, or by public
opinionwhich connives at, if it does not inspire, the deeds of lawless violence. Legislatures of states have framed a
code of laws which is more cruel and unjust than any enforced by a former slave state. The right of franchise has
been practically annulled in every one of the former slave states, in not one of which, today, can a man vote, think,
or act as he pleases. He must conform his views to the views of the men who have usurped every function of
governmentwho, at the point of the dagger, and with shotgun, have made themselves masters in defiance of every
law or precedent in our history as a government. They have usurped government with the weapons of the cowards
and assassins, and they maintain themselves in power by the most approved practices of the most odious of tyrants.
These men have shed as much innocent blood as the bloody triumvirate of Rome. Today, red handed murderers
and assassins sit in the high places of power, and bask in the smiles of innocence and beauty. Now that slavery has
been abolished, Fortune believes, black people
A. are chattel
B. have fewer rights than before
C. are protected by laws
D. can succeed in the white man�s world
E. inspire lawless violence
Answer: B
Question: 91
He was born a slave, but T. Thomas Fortune (18561928) went on to become a journalist, editor, and civil rights
activist, founding several early black newspapers and a civil rights organization that predated W. E. B. DuBois
Niagara Movement (later the NAACP). Like many black leaders of his time, Fortune was torn between the radical
leanings of DuBois and the more conservative ideology of Booker T. Washington. This 1884 essay, “The Negro
and the Nation,” dates from his more militant period. The war of the Rebellion settled only one question: It forever
settled the question of chattel slavery in this country. It forever choked the life out of the infamy of the
Constitutional right of one man to rob another, by purchase of his person, or of his honest share of the produce of
his own labor. But this was the only question permanently and irrevocably settled. Nor was this the all-absorbing
question involved. The right of a state to secede from the socalled Union remains where it was when the
treasonable shot upon Fort Sumter aroused the people to all the horrors of internecine war. And the measure of
protection which the national government owes the individual members of states, a right imposed upon it by the
adoption of the Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution, remains still to be affirmed. It was not sufficient that
the federal government should expend its blood and treasure to unfetter the limbs of four millions of people. There
can be a slavery more odious, more galling, than mere chattel slavery. It has been declared to be an act of charity
to enforce ignorance upon the slave, since to inform his intelligence would simply be to make his unnatural lot all
the more unbearable. Instance the miserable existence of sop, the great black moralist. But this is just what the
manumission of the black people of this country try has accomplished. They are more absolutely under the control
of the Southern whites; they are more systematically robbed of their labor; they are more poorly housed, clothed
and fed, than under the slave rgime; and they enjoy, practically, less of the protection of the laws of the state or of
the federal government. When they appeal to the federal government they are told by the Supreme Court to go to
the state authorities as if they would have appealed to the one had the other given them that protection to which
their sovereign citizenship entitles them! Practically, there is no law in the United States which extends its
protecting arm over the black man and his rights. He is, like the Irishman in Ireland, an alien in his native land.
There is no central or auxiliary authority to which he can appeal for protection. Wherever he turns he finds the
strong arm of constituted authority powerless to protect him. The farmer and the merchant rob him with absolute
immunity, and irresponsible ruffians murder him without fear of punishment, undeterred by the law, or by public
opinionwhich connives at, if it does not inspire, the deeds of lawless violence. Legislatures of states have framed a
code of laws which is more cruel and unjust than any enforced by a former slave state. The right of franchise has
been practically annulled in every one of the former slave states, in not one of which, today, can a man vote, think,
or act as he pleases. He must conform his views to the views of the men who have usurped every function of
governmentwho, at the point of the dagger, and with shotgun, have made themselves masters in defiance of every
law or precedent in our history as a government. They have usurped government with the weapons of the cowards
and assassins, and they maintain themselves in power by the most approved practices of the most odious of tyrants.
These men have shed as much innocent blood as the bloody triumvirate of Rome. Today, red handed murderers
and assassins sit in the high places of power, and bask in the smiles of innocence and beauty. Fortune uses the
example of the Irishman to show that
A. famine is not alien to people in the United States
B. one can be treated as a foreigner in the land of one�s birth
C. some people have a native land; others have none
D. one can be born to slavery but rise above it
E. people may be treated more fairly in a monarchy than in a democracy
Answer: B
Question: 92
Musical notes, like all sounds, are a result of the sound waves created by movement, like the rush of air through a
trumpet. Musical notes are very regular sound waves. The qualities of these waveshow much they displace
molecules, and how often they do sogive the note its particular sound. How much a sound wave displaces
molecules affects the volume of the note. How frequently a sound wave reaches your ear determines whether the
note is high or low pitched. When scientists describe how high or low a sound is, they use a numerical
measurement of its frequency, such as “440 vibrations per second,” rather than the letters musicians use. In this
passage, musical notes are used primarily to
A. illustrate the difference between human-produced and nonhuman produced sound.
B. demonstrate the difference between musical sound and all other sound.
C. provide an example of sound properties common to all sound.
D. convey the difference between musical pitch and frequency pitch.
E. explain the connection between number and letter names for sounds
Answer: C
Question: 93
Musical notes, like all sounds, are a result of the sound waves created by movement, like the rush of air through a
trumpet. Musical notes are very regular sound waves. The qualities of these waveshow much they displace
molecules, and how often they do sogive the note its particular sound. How much a sound wave displaces
molecules affects the volume of the note. How frequently a sound wave reaches your ear determines whether the
note is high or low pitched. When scientists describe how high or low a sound is, they use a numerical
measurement of its frequency, such as “440 vibrations per second,” rather than the letters musicians use. All of the
following are true statements about pitch, according to the passage, EXCEPT:
A. Nonmusical sounds cannot be referred to in terms of pitch.
B. Pitch is solely determined by the frequency of the sound wave.
C. Pitch is closely related to the vibration of molecules.
D. Pitch cannot be accurately described with letter names.
E. Humans� perception of pitch is not affected by the intensity of the sound wave.
Answer: A
Question: 94
Margaret Walker, who would become one of the most important twentieth century African-American poets, was
born in Birmingham, Alabama, in 1915. Her parents, a minister and a music teacher, encouraged her to read poetry
and philosophy even as a child. Walker completed her high school education at Gilbert Academy in New Orleans
and went on to attend New Orleans University for two years. It was then that the important Harlem Renaissance
poet Langston Hughes recognized her talent and persuaded her to continue her education in the North. She
transferred to Northwestern University in Illinois, where she received a degree in English in 1935. Her poem, “For
My People,” which would remain one of her most important works, was also her first publication, appearing in
Poetry magazine in 1937. The passage cites Walkers interaction with Langston Hughes as
A. instrumental in her early work being published.
B. influential in her decision to study at Northwestern University.
C. not as important at the time it happened as it is now, due to Hughes� fame.
D. a great encouragement for Walker�s confidence as a poet.
E. important to her choice to study at New Orleans University.
Answer: B
Question: 95
Margaret Walker, who would become one of the most important twentieth century African-American poets, was
born in Birmingham, Alabama, in 1915. Her parents, a minister and a music teacher, encouraged her to read poetry
and philosophy even as a child. Walker completed her high school education at Gilbert Academy in New Orleans
and went on to attend New Orleans University for two years. It was then that the important Harlem Renaissance
poet Langston Hughes recognized her talent and persuaded her to continue her education in the North. She
transferred to Northwestern University in Illinois, where she received a degree in English in 1935. Her poem, “For
My People,” which would remain one of her most important works, was also her first publication, appearing in
Poetry magazine in 1937. The passage suggests that Walkers decision to become a poet
A. occurred before she entered college.
B. was primarily a result of her interaction with Hughes.
C. was not surprising, given her upbringing.
D. occurred after her transfer to Northwestern University.
E. was sudden and immediately successful.
Answer: C
Question: 96
F. Scott Fitzgerald was a prominent American writer of the twentieth century. This passage comes from one of his
short stories and tells the story of a young John Unger leaving home for boarding school. John T. Unger came from
a family that had been well known in Hades a small town on the Mississippi River for several generations. John�s
father had held the amateur golf championship through many a heated contest; Mrs. Unger was known “from hot-
box to hot-bed,” as the local phrase went, for her political addresses; and young John T. Unger, who had just
turned sixteen, had danced all the latest dances from New York before he put on long trousers. And now, for a
certain time, he was to be away from home . That respect for a New England education which is the bane of all
provincial places, which drains them yearly of their most promising young men, had seized upon his parents.
Nothing would suit them but that he should go to St. Midass School near BostonHades was too small to hold their
darling and gifted son. Now in Hadesas you know if you ever have been there the names of the more fashionable
preparatory schools and colleges mean very little. The inhabitants have been so long out of the world that, though
they make a show of keeping up-to-date in dress and manners and literature, they depend to a great extent on
hearsay, and a function that in Hades would be considered elaborate would doubtless be hailed by a Chicago beef-
princess as “perhaps a little tacky.” John T. Unger was on the eve of departure. Mrs. Unger, with maternal fatuity,
packed his trunks full of linen suits and electric fans, and Mr. Unger presented his son with an asbestos pocket-
book stuffed with money. “Remember, you are always welcome here,” he said. “You can be sure, boy, that we�ll
keep the home fires burning.” “I know,” answered John huskily. “Don�t forget who you are and where you come
from,” continued his father proudly, “and you can do nothing to harm you. You are an Unger�from Hades.” So the
old man and the young shook hands, and John walked away with tears streaming from his eyes. Ten minutes later
he had passed outside the city limits and he stopped to glance back for the last time. Over the gates the old-
fashioned Victorian motto seemed strangely attractive to him. His father had tried time and time again to have it
changed to something with a little more push and verve about it, such as “Hades�Your Opportunity,” or else a plain
“Welcome” sign set over a hearty handshake pricked out in electric lights. The old motto was a little depressing,
Mr. Unger had thoughtbut now. So John took his look and then set his face resolutely toward his destination. And,
as he turned away, the lights of Hades against the sky seemed full of a warm and passionate beauty. The tone of
sentence “their darling and gifted son” can best be described as
A. compassionate.
B. sincere.
C. sardonic.
D. dismayed.
E. understated.
Answer: C
Question: 97
F. Scott Fitzgerald was a prominent American writer of the twentieth century. This passage comes from one of his
short stories and tells the story of a young John Unger leaving home for boarding school. John T. Unger came from
a family that had been well known in Hades a small town on the Mississippi River for several generations. John�s
father had held the amateur golf championship through many a heated contest; Mrs. Unger was known “from hot-
box to hot-bed,” as the local phrase went, for her political addresses; and young John T. Unger, who had just
turned sixteen, had danced all the latest dances from New York before he put on long trousers. And now, for a
certain time, he was to be away from home. That respect for a New England education which is the bane of all
provincial places, which drains them yearly of their most promising young men, had seized upon his parents.
Nothing would suit them but that he should go to St. Midass School near BostonHades was too small to hold their
darling and gifted son. Now in Hadesas you know if you ever have been there the names of the more fashionable
preparatory schools and colleges mean very little. The inhabitants have been so long out of the world that, though
they make a show of keeping up-to-date in dress and manners and literature, they depend to a great extent on
hearsay, and a function that in Hades would be considered elaborate would doubtless be hailed by a Chicago beef-
princess as “perhaps a little tacky.” John T. Unger was on the eve of departure. Mrs. Unger, with maternal fatuity,
packed his trunks full of linen suits and electric fans, and Mr. Unger presented his son with an asbestos pocket-
book stuffed with money. “Remember, you are always welcome here,” he said. “You can be sure, boy, that we�ll
keep the home fires burning.” “I know,” answered John huskily. “Don�t forget who you are and where you come
from,” continued his father proudly, “and you can do nothing to harm you. You are an Unger�from Hades.” So the
old man and the young shook hands, and John walked away with tears streaming from his eyes. Ten minutes later
he had passed outside the city limits and he stopped to glance back for the last time. Over the gates the old-
fashioned Victorian motto seemed strangely attractive to him. His father had tried time and time again to have it
changed to something with a little more push and verve about it, such as “Hades�Your Opportunity,” or else a plain
“Welcome” sign set over a hearty handshake pricked out in electric lights. The old motto was a little depressing,
Mr. Unger had thoughtbut now. So John took his look and then set his face resolutely toward his destination. And,
as he turned away, the lights of Hades against the sky seemed full of a warm and passionate beauty. The “Chicago
beef-princess” can best be described as representing the Chicago upper class by way of which literary device?
A. Anachronism
B. Simile
C. Apostrophe
D. Metaphor
E. Neologism
Answer: D
Question: 98
F. Scott Fitzgerald was a prominent American writer of the twentieth century. This passage comes from one of his
short stories and tells the story of a young John Unger leaving home for boarding school. John T. Unger came from
a family that had been well known in Hades a small town on the Mississippi River for several generations. John�s
father had held the amateur golf championship through many a heated contest; Mrs. Unger was known “from hot-
box to hot-bed,” as the local phrase went, for her political addresses; and young John T. Unger, who had just
turned sixteen, had danced all the latest dances from New York before he put on long trousers. And now, for a
certain time, he was to be away from home. That respect for a New England education which is the bane of all
provincial places, which drains them yearly of their most promising young men, had seized upon his parents.
Nothing would suit them but that he should go to St. Midass School near BostonHades was too small to hold their
darling and gifted son. Now in Hadesas you know if you ever have been there the names of the more fashionable
preparatory schools and colleges mean very little. The inhabitants have been so long out of the world that, though
they make a show of keeping up-to-date in dress and manners and literature, they depend to a great extent on
hearsay, and a function that in Hades would be considered elaborate would doubtless be hailed by a Chicago beef-
princess as “perhaps a little tacky.” John T. Unger was on the eve of departure. Mrs. Unger, with maternal fatuity,
packed his trunks full of linen suits and electric fans, and Mr. Unger presented his son with an asbestos pocket-
book stuffed with money. “Remember, you are always welcome here,” he said. “You can be sure, boy, that we�ll
keep the home fires burning.” “I know,” answered John huskily. “Don�t forget who you are and where you come
from,” continued his father proudly, “and you can do nothing to harm you. You are an Unger�from Hades.” So the
old man and the young shook hands, and John walked away with tears streaming from his eyes. Ten minutes later
he had passed outside the city limits and he stopped to glance back for the last time. Over the gates the old-
fashioned Victorian motto seemed strangely attractive to him. His father had tried time and time again to have it
changed to something with a little more push and verve about it, such as “Hades�Your Opportunity,” or else a plain
“Welcome” sign set over a hearty handshake pricked out in electric lights. The old motto was a little depressing,
Mr. Unger had thoughtbut now. So John took his look and then set his face resolutely toward his destination. And,
as he turned away, the lights of Hades against the sky seemed full of a warm and passionate beauty. The phrase
“maternal fatuity”, suggests that
A. John will not need linen suits and electric fans at St. Midas�s.
B. John�s mother packed frantically and ineffectively.
C. John�s mother was excessively doting.
D. John resented his mother packing for him.
E. John never enjoyed linen suits or electric fans.
Answer: A
Question: 99
F. Scott Fitzgerald was a prominent American writer of the twentieth century. This passage comes from one of his
short stories and tells the story of a young John Unger leaving home for boarding school. John T. Unger came from
a family that had been well known in Hades a small town on the Mississippi River for several generations. John�s
father had held the amateur golf championship through many a heated contest; Mrs. Unger was known “from hot-
box to hot-bed,” as the local phrase went, for her political addresses; and young John T. Unger, who had just
turned sixteen, had danced all the latest dances from New York before he put on long trousers. And now, for a
certain time, he was to be away from home. That respect for a New England education which is the bane of all
provincial places, which drains them yearly of their most promising young men, had seized upon his parents.
Nothing would suit them but that he should go to St. Midass School near BostonHades was too small to hold their
darling and gifted son. Now in Hadesas you know if you ever have been there the names of the more fashionable
preparatory schools and colleges mean very little. The inhabitants have been so long out of the world that, though
they make a show of keeping up-to-date in dress and manners and literature, they depend to a great extent on
hearsay, and a function that in Hades would be considered elaborate would doubtless be hailed by a Chicago beef-
princess as “perhaps a little tacky.” John T. Unger was on the eve of departure. Mrs. Unger, with maternal fatuity,
packed his trunks full of linen suits and electric fans, and Mr. Unger presented his son with an asbestos pocket-
book stuffed with money. “Remember, you are always welcome here,” he said. “You can be sure, boy, that we�ll
keep the home fires burning.” “I know,” answered John huskily. “Don�t forget who you are and where you come
from,” continued his father proudly, “and you can do nothing to harm you. You are an Unger�from Hades.” So the
old man and the young shook hands, and John walked away with tears streaming from his eyes. Ten minutes later
he had passed outside the city limits and he stopped to glance back for the last time. Over the gates the old-
fashioned Victorian motto seemed strangely attractive to him. His father had tried time and time again to have it
changed to something with a little more push and verve about it, such as “Hades�Your Opportunity,” or else a plain
“Welcome” sign set over a hearty handshake pricked out in electric lights. The old motto was a little depressing,
Mr. Unger had thoughtbut now. So John took his look and then set his face resolutely toward his destination. And,
as he turned away, the lights of Hades against the sky seemed full of a warm and passionate beauty. From the
conversation between John and his father in paragraphs 36, it can be inferred that John feels
A. rejected and angry.
B. melancholic but composed.
C. impassive and indifferent.
D. resigned but filled with dread.
E. relieved but apprehensive.
Answer: B
Question: 100
F. Scott Fitzgerald was a prominent American writer of the twentieth century. This passage comes from one of his
short stories and tells the story of a young John Unger leaving home for boarding school. John T. Unger came from
a family that had been well known in Hades a small town on the Mississippi River for several generations. John�s
father had held the amateur golf championship through many a heated contest; Mrs. Unger was known “from hot-
box to hot-bed,” as the local phrase went, for her political addresses; and young John T. Unger, who had just
turned sixteen, had danced all the latest dances from New York before he put on long trousers. And now, for a
certain time, he was to be away from home. That respect for a New England education which is the bane of all
provincial places, which drains them yearly of their most promising young men, had seized upon his parents.
Nothing would suit them but that he should go to St. Midass School near BostonHades was too small to hold their
darling and gifted son. Now in Hadesas you know if you ever have been there the names of the more fashionable
preparatory schools and colleges mean very little. The inhabitants have been so long out of the world that, though
they make a show of keeping up-to-date in dress and manners and literature, they depend to a great extent on
hearsay, and a function that in Hades would be considered elaborate would doubtless be hailed by a Chicago beef-
princess as “perhaps a little tacky.” John T. Unger was on the eve of departure. Mrs. Unger, with maternal fatuity,
packed his trunks full of linen suits and electric fans, and Mr. Unger presented his son with an asbestos pocket-
book stuffed with money. “Remember, you are always welcome here,” he said. “You can be sure, boy, that we�ll
keep the home fires burning.” “I know,” answered John huskily. “Don�t forget who you are and where you come
from,” continued his father proudly, “and you can do nothing to harm you. You are an Unger�from Hades.” So the
old man and the young shook hands, and John walked away with tears streaming from his eyes. Ten minutes later
he had passed outside the city limits and he stopped to glance back for the last time. Over the gates the old-
fashioned Victorian motto seemed strangely attractive to him. His father had tried time and time again to have it
changed to something with a little more push and verve about it, such as “Hades�Your Opportunity,” or else a plain
“Welcome” sign set over a hearty handshake pricked out in electric lights. The old motto was a little depressing,
Mr. Unger had thoughtbut now. So John took his look and then set his face resolutely toward his destination. And,
as he turned away, the lights of Hades against the sky seemed full of a warm and passionate beauty. Johns
meditation on the towns sign in the passage serves primarily to suggest a contrast between
A. John�s love of Victorian things and his father�s love of modern things.
B. his father�s commercialism and John�s sentimentality.
C. John�s previous role as a part of the town and his new role as nostalgic outsider.
D. his father�s naivety and John�s pragmatism.
E. the old-fashioned atmosphere in the town before John�s father influenced it and its current modernity.
Answer: C
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